libralthinking:

Henry Jenkins talking about the Harry Potter Alliance, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, and Nerdfighteria, and the role of libraries in fan culture?  Yes, please.  Would love this to be more in depth, but take a look.

uispeccoll:

We had a request to feature more media fanzines, so here is a box, chosen at random, from the incredible Mariellen “Ming” Wathne Fanzine Collection (MsC 313).  [Read about the AMAZING collection here!]

This particular box includes Beauty and the Beast and B&tB crossover fanzines dating from 1988-1992.  Beauty and the Beast was a CBS show from 1987-1990 starring Linda Hamilton and Ron Pearlman with George R. R. Martin as a writer and producer!

Stop by and read!

meeedeee:

bathtubbutterbeer:

callmekitto:

like-microwave-pizza:

so my roommate melissa works part-time at a thrift shop pricing donations and she happened to come across this gem

and bought it for me because she is a good friend

it’s signed, framed and dated 1976

this is framed ot3 fanart from 1976

it is now hanging on the wall in our living room for everyone to see

life is full of so many wonders

I’m really curious about the story behind a) who drew this, and b) who it was for.

Pre-internet fandom is the most interesting.

The artist is Connie Faddis. She published a beautiful series of  Star Trek zines called Interphase and illustrated one of the most sought after Starsky & Hutch fanzines, Scales of Justice.

24 Fan Cons better run than DashCon

krytella:

Wondering if you should ever go to a con after the DashCon kerfuffle? Did you know that there are literally hundreds of cons worldwide about media things that Tumblr is into? This is a totally non-comprehensive list of conventions you might want to check out, limited to English-speaking countries because that’s what I know about. These are all conventions with a good reputation for being fun and well managed. They are annual events unless otherwise noted.

The fanlore page on cons is a great resource, too.

If you’re into Doctor Who:
Gallifrey One tickets sell out super fast. Many great guests. They usually have a Doctor. Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Chicago TARDIS Chicago, IL, USA.
Con Kasterborous  Huntsville, Alabama, USA
L.I. Who  Long Island, NY, USA

If you’re into slash:
Slash-specific cons tend to be small and social. These cons have no celebrity guests, they’re all about fans getting together and hanging out. The kind of place where you’ll be talking to someone, glance at their name tag, and realize they’re a fic writer or fanartist you’ve been following for years. Usually 18+ for full attendees, with a… um… bawdy environment.

Con.TXT  based on reviews, this is a great con. Silver Spring, Maryland, USA
Escapade the longest-running slash con. Meet your fannish foremothers! Los Angeles, CA, USA.
get__together 10 year old established slash con. Wellington, NZ
Sinpozium Sydney, NSW, Australia
Muskrat Jamboree  Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA (every other year)
Pacificon Seattle, WA, USA (every other year)

If you’re into anime:
Room 801 18+ Yaoi con. Sydney, NSW, Australia
Yaoi-Con  18+ Yaoi con. San Francisco, CA, USA.
Sakura-Con  Large general anime/manga con with a lot of teenage attendees. Seattle, WA, USA.
Otakon Huge anime con with lots of artist and writer guests. Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
Anime Central (ACen)  Chicago, IL, USA.

If you’re into fanvids:
Vividcon this is the place to be if you make fanvids. Chicago, IL, USA

If you’re into Supernatural:
Note: the Supernatural cons with the actors as guests are for-profit cons run by an event production company. They are a completely different environment from fan-run cons. These cons are more expensive and don’t have much to do other than pay a bunch to meet the actors. If that’s what you want, have at it. I will not be linking to any of those cons here.

Wincon a small, slash-friendly fan focused con that started as an SPN con but now covers various fandoms. Different US locations every year.

If you’re into Harry Potter and/or YA books:
LeakyCon large con that was founded in the years after the books. Many non-HP guests from online media that will make you feel like An Old if you read the Harry Potter books when they came out. Also lots of YA author guests. Various locations around the USA.

If you want to see as many famous actors as possible, who cares about any other programming:
Dragon*Con  Atlanta, Georgia, USA
San Diego Comic Con. You don’t need a link, right?
Emerald City Comicon  Seattle, WA, USA
Fan Expo Canada  Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Supanova  everywhere in Australia
Do a web search for “comic con” in your area or ask around. Most major metro areas have cons that focus on bringing celebrity guests.

If you’re into Game of Thrones:
TitanCon Belfast, Northern Ireland. Has essentially become the Game of Thrones con since the show started filming there.

If you’re into Science Fiction & Fantasy books:
SF/F-specific cons are some of the longest running and numerous. Search “science fiction convention” and your local area to find one. They tend to have a mix of book, TV, and movie focus and author guests rather than actors. SF con culture has been around long enough that many of the people in their teens and 20s you’ll see at a con grew up going to them.

fandom thoughts

fozmeadows:

therisingtithes:

fozmeadows:

So, here’s a thought:

The types of fandom that are most often considered traditional and acceptable, and which are often either male-dominated or coded as masculine, tend to be acquisitive, whether in terms of knowledge (obscure trivia) or merchandise (collectibles). Whereas, by contrast, the types of fandom most often considered insincere, non-serious or “unreal”, and which are often either female-dominated or coded as feminine, tend to be creative, such as making costumes, writing fanfic and drawing fanart

Which is arguably an interesting expression of gender dynamics within fandom, in the sense of being a direct response to gender representation within the canon of particular franchises: namely, that because men, and particularly straight white cismen, are so ubiquitous within popular narrative(s), they have less need to create personal fan interpretations in order to see themselves represented, or to correct/ameliorate stereotypical portrayals; whereas women - and, indeed, members of any other group likely to suffer from poor representation - do.

Which isn’t to say that it’s impossible to be both an acquisitive and a creative fan - not by any stretch of the imagination. Nor am I trying to say that the only reason someone might be an acquisitive fan is because they’re complacent about issues of bias and representation, or that the only reason someone might be a creative fan is because they want to address an issue in the canon. Some people like to collect, some like to make, and some like both, or neither. It’s fine! But I do think that, when it comes to conversations about Fake Geek Girls and what being a “real fan” means - conversations which tend to be strongly gendered - the split between acquisition/creation tends to follow gender lines, too: that guys who know All The Facts and buy All The Merch are the REAL fans, whereas girls who just dress up and tell silly headcanon stories aren’t, and that maybe, there’s an interesting reason for why this might be. 

[bolded for emphasis]

This is interesting. Especially because an extrapolation from that is that the ‘orthodox’, ‘traditional’ mode of interacting with a work - knowing, staying close to the first interpretation, valuing the refusal to budge from those first interpretations over being inclusive and fluid - is therefore masculine-coded, but it’s feminine-coded to be canonically fluid, intensely metacritical, artistically motivated, and to encourage creative deconstruction and reconstruction

Where 'MascFandom' is a kind of Canon Literalism, 'FemFandom' by comparison is Canon Exegesis

Which is probably a sliver of the backlash that grows into the Fake Geek Girl conversation - that people think the ‘text’ of their fandom ‘faith’ shouldn’t be tampered with or recontextualized, whereas other people insist that it has to evolve to meet the needs of the people who it serves? 

I’m not sure how it accommodates for works like Welcome to Night Vale (a really good place, I think to discuss fandoms and their interactions with media), where the literalism of its canon is the establishment that blanks are required to be filled in by the audience. Fan-created artwork of any type, arguably, is as valuable a ‘history’ of Night Vale as Cecil’s radio show, because so many details are up in the air anyway, and have to be informed by the information you do still have (e.g. nothing says Cecil can’t be a blob, so what would it mean if he were a blob?).

This is absolutely fascinating to me now, and will surely make up a large part of actual notes I have about what I can now call ‘exegetical fandom theory’ and how people interact with and alter media.

Reblogging for commentary, and because the divide between literalism/exegesis is another fascinating lens through which to examine both fandom generally, and its gender dynamics. 

See also obsession_inc on affirmational vs. transformational fandom.

sharpestrose:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

See also why making Junko shsl gyaru is so much more politically complicated than the ‘fashionista’ translation — the closer equivalent would be however you’d describe Nicki Minaj’s aesthetic.
Junko is flagged as a threat and undermined as a silly girl airhead simultaneously through being gyaru, because she’s something outre and sexy that gets slurred as dumb trash by people threatened by her having so much of her own power. 

sharpestrose:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

See also why making Junko shsl gyaru is so much more politically complicated than the ‘fashionista’ translation — the closer equivalent would be however you’d describe Nicki Minaj’s aesthetic.

Junko is flagged as a threat and undermined as a silly girl airhead simultaneously through being gyaru, because she’s something outre and sexy that gets slurred as dumb trash by people threatened by her having so much of her own power. 


Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom. (more masterposts)
T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan FictionThere have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.
The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)
Sherlock HolmesDespite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 
Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
"The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)
Star TrekNow we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 
Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
"Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

GeocitiesIn 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.
geocities archive (x)
the death of Geocities (x)
Fanfiction.net1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.
In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare ControversyYou might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 
The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)
ForumsAround this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)
tumblr.In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 
Tumblr and fandom (x)

Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom.
(more masterposts)

T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan Fiction
There have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.

  • The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)

Sherlock Holmes
Despite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 

  • Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
  • A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
  • "The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)

Star Trek
Now we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 

  • Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
  • The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
  • "Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
  • Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

Geocities
In 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.

  • geocities archive (x)
  • the death of Geocities (x)

Fanfiction.net
1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.

  • In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
  • Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare Controversy
You might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in 
the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 

  • The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
  • People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)

Forums
Around this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)

tumblr.
In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 

  • Tumblr and fandom (x)

The Places Fandom Dwells: A Cautionary Tale

mizstorge:

Just about seven years ago, on 29 May 2007, hundreds of fans with accounts at Livejournal made the shocking discovery that their blogs, and those of some of their friends and favorite fandom communities, had been deleted without prior notice.

It’s estimated that Livejournal suspended approximately 500 blog accounts. The only notice of this was was the strike through the names of the suspended blogs, which led to this event being called Strikethrough.

At the time, Livejournal was the primary blogging platform for fandom. Its friends list and threaded conversations enabled fans to find each other and have discussions. Its privacy settings allowed fans to share as much or as little as they chose. It was a place to publish and archive fan fic, art, and meta. These features give some idea why the deletions of so many fandom blogs was devastating.

Speculation and uncertainty were rampant during the two days it took for Livejournal to finally respond to demands from users for information. At first, LJ stated only that it had been advised that journals listing an illegal activity as an interest could be regarded as soliciting for that illegal activity, which put the site at legal risk. It was eventually revealed that Livejournal and its owners at the time, Six Apart, had been contacted by a group calling themselves Warriors for Innocence, a conservative Christian organization with ties to the militia movement who accused of being a haven for pedophiles and child pornography.

LJ had based the account suspensions on the tags used in LJ blogs. LJ users list their interests in their profiles, and those interests functions as tags. LJ took the blanket view that there was no difference between blogs listing “rape”.”incest”, or “pedophilia” among their interests, and blogs with posts tagged “rape”. “incest”, or “pedophilia”. As a consequence, some of the accounts that were suspended were support sites for people like rape survivors and gay teens, as well as the fandom sites that posted book discussions, RP, fan fiction, and fan art.

Livejournal grudgingly issued a partial apology to users on 31 May, but it took months for the organization to sort through the suspended blogs. According to Livejournal, most of the suspended accounts were restored. Not all of the suspended accounts were restored, and some of those that weren’t belonged to the support groups and fandoms.

One result of Strikethrough was that many communities and individual fans locked their blogs so the content could be viewed only community members, or those on their friends lists. Other fans opened accounts at blogging platforms like JournalFen, The Greatest Journal, or Insane Journal. There was definitely an atmosphere of mistrust and paranoia that hadn’t previously existed, and part of the problem was that Livejournal had not come through with promised clarification about what sort of content violated the ToS.

So, of course, it happened all over again.

On 3 August, Livejournal once again suspended a number of accounts without warning. This time, the account names were bolded, and the event became known as Boldthrough.

These deletions were the result of decisions made by a group consisting of members of LiveJournal’s Abuse Prevention Team, made up of LiveJournal employees, and Six Apart staff, that had been set up to review blog content. This group was had been empowered to declare blog content offensive, a violation of the ToS that was defined by the team as content not containing enough serious artistic value to offset the sexual nature of the material. The team was empowered to terminate accounts without warning.

Anxious and angry LJ users had to wail ten days until LJ issued a response. Eventually, the ToS was changed to state that accounts deemed in violation of the ToS would in future be deleted only if the offender refused to delete offending content.

Just a few days before Strikethrough, LJ user astolat proposed a new blogging platform and fan fic archive be created by fans, for fans. This was the birth of the Organization for Transformative Works, a non-profit organization dedicated to provide access to fanworks, and to protect and defend fanworks from commercial exploitation and legal challenge. Strikethrough and Boldthrough definitely pushed the project along. OTW opened DreamWidth in beta mode in April 2009, and began open beta testing of Archive of Our Own in November 2009.

In mid-January 2010, DreamWidth came under pressure by an undisclosed group who tried to convince DW’s server and PayPal, among others, that DW was a platform for child pornography. DW refused to give in to the harassment and intimidation, and promptly notifed users about the situation. The only consequence of the group’s pressure was that new requests for paid services were temporarily put on hold until DW was able to find a new payment processor service. DW remained true to its Guiding Principles by keeping users informed throughout this incident, and respecting freedom of expression by refusing to delete any posts or blogs to satisfy the demands of the group of trolls.

Which brings us to Tumblr.

Tumblr was launched in 2007. While not all fans have embraced it, citing reasons like character restrictions in replies and asks and the difficulty of finding others who share one’s fandom, it’s certain that the majority of fandoms are well-represented.

However, in July 2013, fans once again expressed outrage when Tumblr - without warning – removed without warning accounts flagged as “NSFW” or “Adult” from public searches, made those blogs inaccessible to Tumblr users not already following them, and deleted a number of tags from its mobile app, including #gay, #lesbian and #bisexual. In a manner unsettlingly reminiscent of Strikethrough and Boldthrough, Tumblr did not immediately respond, and the response posted 24 hours later was widely regarded as a non-apology apology. Tumblr claimed it had been trying to get rid of commercial porn blogss, and eventually asserted that all the removed accounts had been reinstated.

If there’s a lesson to be learned from this, it’s that of George Santayana: Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. Most blogging and social networking sites are in business to make a profit, and fandoms make them uncomfortable. They inevitably take steps to control the content being posted, to keep outside groups or their new owners happy, disrupting fandoms and deleting material that fans had considered to be safely stored.

The only solution I can see is for fans to copy and back up the things that are important. Maintain active accounts at several sites. Keep a list of your friends’ pseudonyms and emails.

Because the only thing that’s certain is that it’s going to happen again.

I highly recommed A brief history of fandom, for the teenagers on here who somehow think tumblr invented fandom: by ofhouseadama.

I intend to make proper footnotes at some point, but until then, here’s a list of sources used in writing this article:

http://astolat.livejournal.com/150556.html

http://astridv.livejournal.com/84769.html

http://boingboing.net/2007/05/31/lj-purge-drama-who-a.html

http://www.dailydot.com/culture/livejournal-decline-timeline/

http://www.dailydot.com/lifestyle/tumblr-nsfw-content-tags-search/

http://www.dailydot.com/opinion/tumblr-statement-banned-hashtags/

http://www.dailydot.com/society/pros-cons-tumblr-livejournal-fandom/

http://www.dailydot.com/society/tracking-livejournal-fandom-diaspora-infographic/

http://dw-news.dreamwidth.org/16590.html?view=top-only#comments

http://elke-tanzer.dreamwidth.org/951013.html

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Archive_Of_Our_Own

http://fandom-flies.livejournal.com/profile

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Boldthrough

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Dreamwidth

http://fanlore.org/wiki/LiveJournal

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Strikethrough

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Tumblr

http://fanthropology.livejournal.com/374988.html

http://hatteress.tumblr.com/post/55834911159/tumblrs-new-nsfw-restrictions-and-why-turning-off-safe

http://innocence-jihad.livejournal.com/159327.html

http://innocence-jihad.livejournal.com/31786.html

http://liz-marcs.livejournal.com/283323.html

http://liz-marcs.livejournal.com/283781.html

http://metafandom.livejournal.com/114942.html

http://www.metafilter.com/61636/livejournal-suspends-hundreds-of-accounts#1712054

http://missmediajunkie.blogspot.com/2013/05/why-i-dont-use-tumblr.html

http://news.cnet.com/Mass-deletion-sparks-LiveJournal-revolt/2100-1025_3-6187619.html

http://staff.tumblr.com/post/55906556378/all-weve-heard-from-a-bunch-of-you-who-are

http://www.supernaturalwiki.com/index.php?title=LJ_Strikethrough_2007#After_the_Strikethrough_-_On_to_Boldthrough

http://tech.firstpost.com/news-analysis/the-death-of-the-blog-and-the-rise-of-tumblr-210071.html

http://transformativeworks.org/sites/default/files/OTW_Annual_Report_2007.pdf

http://www.dailydot.com/business/yahoo-tumblr-fandom-lessons/

https://zine.openrightsgroup.org/features/2012/fandom:-open-culture-vs.-closed-platforms

http://www.zdnet.com/after-backlash-yahoos-tumblr-quietly-restores-adult-nsfw-blogs-7000018342/

Thoughtful summary and great collection of links.

One addition/correction: Dreamwidth is not an OTW project, though both OTW and Dreamwidth were developed by fans partly because of frustrations with LiveJournal, including but not limited to Strikethrough.